Bobby Burns

Bobby Burns cocktail. Getty Images photo

The origins of this classic are lost to time, but it emerged in the early 20th century, its name an homage to the famed Scottish poet Robert Burns.

1 oz blended scotch whisky

1 oz sweet vermouth

0.5 oz Bénédictine liqueur

Garnish: lemon peel

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Vieux Carré

Vieux Carré. Getty Images photo

The classic, invented at the Monteleone Hotel in 1930s New Orleans.

0.75 oz rye whisky

0.75 oz Cognac

0.75 oz sweet vermouth

0.5 oz Bénédictine liqueur

2 dashes Angostura bitters

2 dashes Peychaud’s bitters

Garnish: lemon twist

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Golden Ratio

Golden Ratio. Jana Bizzarri photo

This cocktail by Marta Ess of Halifax, NS, won the national Patron Perfectionist cocktail. She represented Canada on the global stage in Mexico in June.

• 1.5 oz Patron Silver

• 0.75 oz Martini Rosso vermouth

• 0.75 tsp amaro (preferably Amaro Lucano)

• 1 oz pineapple juice

• 0.5 oz lime juice,

• 0.5 oz rich simple syrup (2:1)

• Garnish: freshly grated nutmeg

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De La Louisiane

De La Louisiane. Getty Images photo

The original La Louisiane cocktail dates back to the late 19th century in New Orleans, where it featured equal amounts of rye, vermouth and Bénédictine. This contemporary version, which is far less sweet, is adapted from The PDT Cocktail Book by Jim Meehan (2011).

2 oz rye whisky

0.75 oz Bénédictine

0.75 oz sweet vermouth

3 dashes absinthe

3 dashes Peychaud’s bitters

Garnish: 3 brandied cherries

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Negroni Gelée Shot

Negroni Gelée Shots. Joanne Sasvari photo

These look like those after-dinner gelées you get in fancy restaurants, but come with a boozy and bittersweet kick.

• 1 cup London Dry gin

• 1 cup Campari

• 1 cup sweet vermouth

• 1 cup water

• 4 packets (0.25-ounce each) powdered gelatin

• Garnish: sanding sugar, candied orange zest (optional; recipe below)

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DIY vermouth

Add a personalized twist to your favourite cocktails with this aromatized, fortified wine

For this white vermouth, you’ll need botanicals such as grapefruit peel, bay leaves, dried apples, chamomile and mint tea, which mimic the earthy flavours of the wormwood that gave vermouth its name. Matthew Benevoli photo

Let’s talk about the often-misunderstood aperitif vermouth. What is it? Where does it come from?

Vermouth is fortified wine with herbs, roots, spices and sometimes sugar added. There are a handful of different styles to choose from: the most common offerings are sweet red, traditionally from Italy; and dry white wormwood-infused from France. The word vermouth is the French pronunciation for “wermut,” which is German for wormwood, the mystical herb that gives absinthe its reputation and provides the distinctive dry, bitter note found in vermouth.

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